Aussies Abroad: Georgia Cowderoy

Posted: November 21, 2013 in Recruiting USA Scholarships
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Over the next few months as part of Bring It On Sports recruiting services, we will be highlighting Aussie players who are currently playing college football in the United States. Our goal is to double this number each year by sending the best young gridiron players this country has to offer to play college football on a scholarship! Enjoy this blog series….maybe someday soon we will be doing a feature on you!

Georgia Cowderoy:

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Georgia Cowderoy is a Freshman playing Field Hockey in the USA for the University of Massachusetts Lowell in Lowell, Massachusetts.  She is in her first season with the River Hawks Field Hockey team where she plays forward. at 5 ft 10 in, this Gold Coast, Queensland native is yet another Aussie finding success competing in college athletics in the USA.

School Sports Spotlight: Badminton

Posted: November 19, 2013 in School Sports Programs
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Bring It On Sports teaches many activities and sports, all with the goals of physical education in mind. We thought that we should spotlight, each week, a different sport or activity that we currently offer our schools so that you could get a better idea of the skills and outcomes that we strive to provide through teaching it. This week we will focus on Badminton:

Badminton:

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Badminton is a racquet sport played by either two opposing players (singles) or two opposing pairs (doubles), who take positions on opposite halves of a rectangular court divided by a net. Players score points by striking a shuttlecock with their racquet so that it passes over the net and lands in their opponents’ half of the court. Each side may only strike the shuttlecock once before it passes over the net. A rally ends once the shuttlecock has struck the floor.

Because of the way that the shuttlecock floats in the air, badminton makes for a great sport to introduce racquets to kids of all ages and abilities. There are easy adaptations, including lowering the net or removing it all together.

 

Skills And Objectives:

  • Hand-Eye Coordination
  • Agility
  • Hitting With A Racquet
  • Teamwork
  • Game Sense
  • Ball Skills
  • Cooperation

To book Bring it on Sports for your school please contact us. #bringitonsports #schoolsports #Badminton.

ACT or SAT: Which To Choose???

Posted: in Recruiting USA Scholarships
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Exam

Colleges will accept either the SAT or ACT. So which should you take?

To help you zero in on the right exam, here are seven key differences:

ACT questions tend to be more straightforward.

ACT questions are often easier to understand on a first read. On the SAT, you may need to spend time figuring out what you’re being asked before you can start solving the problem. For example, here are sample questions from the SAT essay and the ACT writing test (their name for the essay):

SAT: What is your view of the claim that something unsuccessful can still have some value?
ACT: In your view, should high schools become more tolerant of cheating?

The SAT has a stronger emphasis on vocabulary.

If you’re an ardent wordsmith, you’ll love the SAT. If words aren’t your thing, you may do better on the ACT.

The ACT has a Science section, while the SAT does not.

You don’t need to know anything about amoebas or chemical reactions for the ACT Science section. It is meant to test your reading and reasoning skills based upon a given set of facts. But if you’re a true science-phobe, the SAT might be a better fit.

The ACT tests more advanced math concepts.

In addition to basic arithmetic, algebra I and II, and geometry, the ACT tests your knowledge of trigonometry, too. That said, the ACT Math section is not necessarily harder, since many students find the questions to be more straightforward than those on the SAT.

The ACT Writing Test is optional on test day, but required by many schools.

The 25-minute SAT essay is required and is factored into your writing score. The 30-minute ACT writing test is optional. If you choose to take it, it is not included in your composite score — schools will see it listed separately. Many colleges require the writing section of the ACT, so be sure to check with the schools where you are applying before opting out.

The SAT is broken up into more sections.

On the ACT, you tackle each content area (English, Math, Reading and Science) in one big chunk, with the optional writing test at the end. On the SAT, the content areas (Critical Reading, Math and Writing) are broken up into 10 sections, with the required essay at the beginning. You do a little math, a little writing, a little critical reading, a little more math, etc. When choosing between the SAT and ACT, ask yourself if moving back and forth between content areas confuse you or keep you energized?

The ACT is more of a “big picture” exam.

College admissions officers care about how you did on each section of the SAT. On the ACT, they’re most concerned with your composite score. So if you’re weak in one content area but strong in others, you could still end up with a very good ACT score and thus make a strong impression with the admissions committee.

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RECRUITING CONSULTATIONS: Ever wanted to get a scholarship but you don’t know how? There are lot’s of things to consider… Academics, Eligibility, Athletic Ability, Which pathway to take?  Bring It On Sports can help you make an informed decision. We can also help you save time by pointing you in the right direction so you can start your journey towards your goal of playing college sports. Book a consultation today.

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#bringitonsports #biosrecruiting

5 Alternatives to Running For Cardio

Posted: November 15, 2013 in Sports Science & Nutrition
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For many of us, Running is not our favourite thing when it comes to a cardio workout. But don’t worry, we have come up with 5 great exercises you can use in place of running that are great for getting that cardio workout you need to burn fat and stay in shape!

National Physical Activity Guidelines for Australians have been developed which encourage Australians to be active every day in as many ways as they can, and to put together 30 minutes or more of moderate-intensity physical activity on most, preferably all days

The National Heart Foundation of Australia also recommends that to benefit health, people should aim, over time, to include 30 minutes or more of moderate-intensity physical activity on most, if not all, days of the week.

Swimming

Swimming is the perfect running alternative if you want a full body workout . Tone your legs, arms, and core with a few laps in the pool. Try intervals to get the most out of your exercise time . Without the impact that comes from running on pavement you can avoid the shock to your joints: no shin splints or sore knees!

Walking

That’s right, simple, relaxing walking is a great way to stay in shape.  Exercising for at least 30 minutes a day to help reduce your risk for heart disease – a leading cause of death in Australia.  Walk to work, to the market, to pick up the kids, or to take a break from your busy day. While a leisurely stroll is always nice, walk at a brisk pace for a good cardio workout.

Dancing

Brush up on your dancing moves while burning calories and strengthening muscles. Join a dance aerobics class or try out a Zumba session in your area. You can also get an excellent workout while enjoying a night out dancing with friends.

Kickboxing

If you don’t love running but you crave the intensity, try a kickboxing class . A full hour of punching, kicking, and other moves will leave you feeling exhausted and exhilarated. This is one of the best activities for high calorie burning. It is also a great weight-bearing exercise that will help to prevent osteoporosis .

Cycling

Cycling is a fun, flexible running alternative. Bike on the weekends with your family or get in a few miles of cycling in the evening after work. For those cold, rainy days, head over to the gym to ride a stationary bike or sign up for an indoor cycling class to really get your blood pumping.

Aussies Abroad: Rachael Doyle

Posted: November 14, 2013 in Recruiting USA Scholarships
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Over the next few months as part of Bring It On Sports recruiting services, we will be highlighting Aussie players who are currently playing college athletics in the United States. Our goal is to double this number each year by sending the best young gridiron players this country has to offer to play college athletics on a scholarship! Enjoy this blog series….maybe someday soon we will be doing a feature on you!

Rachael Doyle:

Rachael Doyle is a soccer player currently in her Senior season with Washington State University where she is a starter. Rachael is originally from North Epping, NSW where she attended Cheltenham Girls High School and was the captain of the Australian National Championship winning New South Wales metro team in 2006. She was a member of the Australian School team that competed and won a series (2-1) against New Zealand. She spent two years with the Central Coast Mariners, including 2009 when the team finished as the league runner-up.  She has had a successful collegiate career at WSU and has been in the starting rotation since her sophomore season in 2011.

Achievements:

  • Captain of the New South Wales Metro Team in 2006
  • Member of the Central Coast Mariners in 2008 & 2009
  • Defensive MVP in 2010 as a freshman for WSU
  • 2011 All Pac-12 Second Team & Pac-12 All-Academic Second Team
  • 2012 NSCAA All-Pacific Region Third Team
  • 2012 Capital One CoSIDA District 8 NCAA Division I All-Academic Second Team
  • 2012 Pac-12 All-Academic First Team

School Sports Spotlight: Lacrosse

Posted: November 13, 2013 in School Sports Programs
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Bring It On Sports teaches many activities and sports, all with the goals of physical education in mind. We thought that we should spotlight, each week, a different sport or activity that we currently offer our schools so that you could get a better idea of the skills and outcomes that we strive to provide through teaching it. This week we will focus on Lacrosse:

Lacrosse:

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Lacrosse is a team sport, originally played by the indigenous peoples of North America, played using a small rubber ball and a long-handled stick called a crosse or lacrosse stick. The boys/men’s version of the game is a contact sport, which requires padding such as shoulder pads, gloves, helmets, elbow pads, cup, and sometimes rib guards. The girls/women’s game limits stick contact and prohibits body contact, requiring little protective equipment. We play the girls/women’s version of the game when we bring Lacrosse to school sports programs.

Offensively, the objective of the game is to score by shooting the ball into an opponent’s goal, using the lacrosse stick to catch, carry, and pass the ball to do so. Defensively, the objective is to keep the opposing team from scoring and gain control of the ball.

Skills And Objectives:

  • Hand-Eye Coordination
  • Agility
  • Swinging An Object
  • Teamwork
  • Game Sense
  • Ball Skills
  • Cooperation

To book Bring it on Sports for your school please contact us. #bringitonsports #schoolsports #lacrosse

#2 Ranked Eastern Illinois Making Noise

Posted: November 12, 2013 in DownUnder Bowl Recruiting USA Scholarships
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Our 2013 Future Stars Camp featured 3 coaches from Eastern Illinois. Since the camp, Eastern Illinois has been making headlines in college football, and currently hold a record of 7-1 and the #2 ranking in Division I FCS. The Panthers only loss of the season came in overtime on the road at Northern Illinois, an FBS school who is currently undefeated and ranked #18 in the BCS standings. The Panthers started their 2013 season by beating up on San Diego State on the road.

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As you can see from the statistic rankings above, The Panthers offense is ranked #1 in the nation in Total Offense, and Jimmy Garoppolo (QB) is ranked #1 in Total Offense and Passing Yards.

The best news for Gridiron players in Australia is that members of the Eastern Illinois coaching staff will be coming back to the Future Stars Camp in 2014. If you would like to register and be part of this amazing week of football, visit our Future Stars 2014 page.

#bringitonsports #biosrecruiting #futurestars2014

School Sports Spotlight: Tennis

Posted: November 7, 2013 in School Sports Programs
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Bring It On Sports teaches many activities and sports, all with the goals of physical education in mind. We thought that we should spotlight, each week, a different sport or activity that we currently offer our schools so that you could get a better idea of the skills and outcomes that we strive to provide through teaching it. This week we will focus on Tennis:

Tennis:

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Tennis is a sport in which either 2 players (singles) or teams of 2 players each (doubles) hit a ball back and forth to each other on a specially marked court over a net using racquets. One side will serve the ball to the other side to start play. The ball can only bounce once on each side before the player must hit it back across the net. Play continues until the ball bounces more than once, it is hit outside the playing area, or is hit into the net on the same side of the court.

Tennis is played by millions of recreational players and is also a popular worldwide spectator sport. The four Grand Slam tournaments (also referred to as the “Majors”) are especially popular: the Australian Open played on hard courts, the French Open played on red clay courts, Wimbledon played on grass courts, and the US Open played also on hard courts.

This game can be adapted to suit all age levels and abilities. Some adaptations include making the net lower, making the racquets bigger, changing the size, shape or type of ball, eliminating the playing area (meaning the only goal is to carry the ball over the net) and finally allowing more than one bounce per side. This game is a great way to introduce kids to racquet sports which require above average hand-eye coordination.

Skills And Objectives:

  • Hand-Eye Coordination
  • Agility
  • Ball Striking
  • Racquet Skills
  • Swinging An Object
  • Teamwork
  • Game Sense
  • Ball Skills
  • Cooperation

To book Bring it on Sports for your school please contact us. #bringitonsports #schoolsports #tennis

UDC & UDA Australian Open Cheer & Dance Championships.

Posted: November 3, 2013 in Aussie Gold Cheer & Dance Championships School Sports Programs
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The UDC & UDA Australian Open Cheer and Dance Championships were held at Luna Park on 12 & 13 October 2013. Bring It On Sports had 3 schools who competed over 2 days of competition.

Blakehurst Primary – Level 1 Primary Cheer & Primary Pom
OLMC – Level 1 High School Cheer & High School Pom
Blakehurst High – Level 2 High School Cheer, High School Pom, Level 2 Group Stunt & Level 3 Group Stunt

Places Were As Follows:

* 1st Place BPS Level 1 Primary Cheer
* 1st Place BHS Level 3 High School Group Stunt
* 2nd Place BPS Primary Pom
* 2nd Place BHS Level 2 Cheer
* 2nd Place BHS Level 2 High School Group Stunt
* 3rd Place OLMC Level 1 Cheer
* 3rd Place BHS High School Pom

A special thank you to all of our coaches, parents, schools and of course the event organisers for a fabulous weekend of Cheerleading at Luna Park.

Choosing Nutrient-Rich Foods

Posted: October 30, 2013 in Sports Science & Nutrition
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Everyone has to eat…that is one thing we know for sure. The problem lies in trying to eat healthy. Bring It On Sports would like to give you a few tips on how you can choose foods that are rich in nutrients and still get the satisfaction that can only come from a good meal.

How Do We Define Nutrient Rich Foods?

Nutrient density relates to the number of nutrients for a particular serving of food. Nutrient dense foods are packed with plenty of vitamins, minerals and other nutrients and usually have fewer calories than those foods considered energy dense. Foods like acai berries, pomegranates, salmon and other foods deemed “superfoods” are considered nutrient dense. These should not be confused with energy dense foods which provide plenty of calories for a serving of food with fewer nutrients.

Consider these foods:

  • Protein. Choose seafood, lean meat and poultry, eggs, beans, peas, soy products, and unsalted nuts and seeds.
  • Fruits. Encourage your child to eat a variety of fresh, canned, frozen or dried fruits — rather than fruit juice. If your child drinks juice, make sure it’s 100 percent juice.
  • Vegetables. Serve a variety of fresh, canned or frozen vegetables — especially dark green, red and orange vegetables, beans and peas.
  • Grains. Choose whole grains, such as whole-wheat bread, oatmeal, popcorn, quinoa, or brown or wild rice.
  • Dairy. Encourage your child to eat and drink fat-free or low-fat dairy products, such as milk, yogurt, cheese or fortified soy beverages.

Aim to limit your child’s calories from solids fats and added sugar, such as butter, cake, soda and pizza. Look for ways to replace solid fats with vegetable and nut oils, which provide essential fatty acids and vitamin E. Oils are naturally present in olives, nuts, avocados and seafood.

#bringitonsports #eatinghealthy